Too Busy to Participate

Too Busy to Participate

What story are you telling yourself?

As we’ve discussed, you are being asked to do more, faster, and with too few resources. You feel as though you are doing the jobs of three people. Your Outlook calendar is triple-booked. Recurring acquisitions add new responsibilities with no additional resources. Consolidations and downsizing shift the jobs, previously handled by your colleagues, to you. You wish a magic wand existed to take away all of the urgent email, last minute requests, and unexpected phone calls that are created by your colleagues.

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Participating with a Purpose

Participating with a Purpose vs Interacting

Participating with a Purpose

“Interacting with others” is comprised of ways in which you can raise your visibility “one-to-one” with others. Unlike interaction, “participating with a purpose” is focused on “one-to-many” experiences with colleagues. Participating is comprised of activities where you raise your visibility when many of your colleagues are present.

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What Is the Impact of Mindset on Participating?

The Impact of Mindset on Participating

Participating and Overwhelm

The most dramatic symptom of our newly christened PTSD (professional traumatic stress disorder) is the belief that “I can’t afford to be out of the office!” If you believe that this statement is true, “I can’t afford to be out of the office!” is at risk of becoming a mindset that hinders your ability to raise your visibility. You may hate Bruce Willis and scowl anytime you see one of his movies advertised. You might hate conflict and do everything you can to avoid a confrontation. Whatever your mindset might be, it is at risk of pre-determining how you interpret and respond to a situation.

Mindset is a habitual mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to a situation.

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Participate with a Purpose

Participate with a Purpose

Carl wants to participate – honestly he does

“Oh, no,” Carl says to himself as an email from his boss slowly unfolds before his eyes. “Not another team building offsite!” Like a hungry ant craving a watermelon for lunch, Carl wonders how to digest this news. Blink. Blink. Blink. He stares at the light on his office phone, silently reminding himself that he has messages waiting. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz.

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Raise Your Visibility & Value

Raise Your Visibility & Value: Visibility Accelerator #6 – Engage with Industry Associations


Raise Your Visibility & Value highlights seven visibility accelerators. Our sixth visibility accelerator is “Engage with Industry Associations.”  Learn how to interact and participate with colleagues outside of your organization.

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Ed’s new book, Raise Your Visibility & Value: Uncover the Lost Art of Connecting on the Job is now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Please check it out and share the word!

Raise Your Visibility & Value

Raise Your Visibility & Value: Visibility Accelerator #5 – Participate with a Purpose


Raise Your Visibility & Value highlights seven visibility accelerators. Our fifth visibility accelerator is “Participate with a Purpose.” Learn how to engage with colleagues in your organization and industry one-to-many.

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Ed’s new book, Raise Your Visibility & Value: Uncover the Lost Art of Connecting on the Job is now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Please check it out and share the word!

Raise Your Visibility & Value

Raise Your Visibility and Value: Creating a Value Identification Statement


Raising your value in your organization is not easy. A great place to start is to create a value identification statement. This document allows you to catalog your current work efforts and also creates a platform for you to use during your conversation with your boss. In this video, listen and watch as Ed reviews an effectively designed value identification statement.

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Ed’s new book, Raise Your Visibility & Value: Uncover the Lost Art of Connecting on the Job is now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Please check it out and share the word!

Ed Evarts

Raise Your Visibility & Value: What Types of Industry Associations Can I Engage With?

The types of industry associations that exist are endless. In an effort to create camaraderie among industry professionals, share best practices, provide education, and create opportunity, every industry is represented by numerous associations. Here are just a couple examples of professions and corresponding associations:

If you are a…              Take some time to explore…         At this website

Nurse                                         The American Nurses Association                   nursingworld.org

HR Manager                  The Society for Human Resources Management                shrm.org

 

Looking for associations that represent a specific category rather than a specific job title or industry? Simply Google your role, profession, or category followed by the word “association.” You are bound to find either a local, national, or international association that will provide you an opportunity to engage with individuals who share your interests.

Ed Evarts

Raise Your Visibility & Value: The Commitment & Complexity in Various Industry Association Roles

Last, we learned about the various roles you can play when engaging with industry associations. Each role has varying degrees of commitment and complexity. Here are a few details for each:

  • Guest. Also known affectionately as a “non-member,” most association meetings and events are open to everyone. Attending an industry association event before you join the association is a great way to “kick the tires” to assess if this is the group for you.
  • Member. Once you join the association, you become eligible for the benefits that come with membership, including reduced registration prices for events and access to industry resources that are not open to non-members.
  • Writer/blogger. Most industry associations have a website, a newsletter, and a blog. If attending a meeting is not possible for you, perhaps providing content for an industry publication is an alternative. Even if you cannot attend every meeting, you can identify a topic of interest to the membership for publication. Industry associations are always seeking content for their newsletters, and your submission will be welcomed.
  • Committee volunteer. Most associations have a number of committees that allow you to help the association including finance, marketing, membership, programming, professional development, public relations, and sponsorship. As a volunteer on a committee, you can bring your professional expertise (i.e., your talent with numbers or your love of the sales process) to the association during the year. Many individuals join a committee before moving on to more complex roles, such as serving on the Board.
  • Special project volunteer. If participating on a committee for a year feels like too much of a commitment, your industry association may host a special event (e.g., a regional conference) during the year. These special events are like a project – they have a start and end date – and once the event is over, so is your commitment.
  • Workshop/webinar/teleclass facilitator, speaker, or panelist. Whether you join your industry association or not, presenting or participating on a panel is a good way to engage with your industry. Associations are always looking for speakers who will elevate the education level of their members.
  • Board of Directors member. When you are ready to maximize your visibility within your industry, the Board of Directors is the place for you. Being on an association Board requires the highest degree of commitment, and represents the highest degree of complexity. Board roles typically include President, President-Elect, and Vice-President for the committee roles listed earlier. Being on a Board can be a very rewarding experience as it provides you the greatest opportunity to impact member experience.
Ed Evarts

Raise Your Visibility & Value: What Roles You Can Play When Engaging with Industry Associations

You can engage with an industry association in several ways. In most associations, there is something for everyone, and each of these roles vary in their degree of commitment and complexity.

You can actively engage with an industry association as a:

  • Guest
  • Member
  • Writer/blogger
  • Committee volunteer
  • Special project volunteer
  • Workshop/webinar/teleclass facilitator, speaker, or panelist
  • Board of Directors member

Next we’ll discuss a few more specifics for each.